Film Screening

Filtering by: Film Screening

FILM | The Battle of Algiers
Oct
25
6:30 PM18:30

FILM | The Battle of Algiers

  • Maison Francaise, East Gallery, Buell Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

With excep­tio­nal archival mate­rials and many inter­views (Alge­ria, France, Italy, United-States) Malek Bensmaïl’s docu­men­tary about Gillo Pontecorvo’s legendary 1965 film, The Battle of Algiers, will give us, sixty years after, a strong look back at this film half­way between history and legend.

The black and white news­reel-style film caused a sensa­tion. Effec­ti­vely banned in France until 1971, the film took on mythi­cal status in Alge­ria, where it was scree­ned each year on tele­vi­sion to comme­mo­rate the coun­try’s inde­pen­dence.

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FILM | Checks and Balances (Contrepouvoirs)
Oct
24
6:00 PM18:00

FILM | Checks and Balances (Contrepouvoirs)

  • Maison Francaise, East Gallery, Buell Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Screening and discussion with filmmaker Malek Bensmaïl, in conversation with Madeleine Dobie and Mohamed Amer Meziane.

Algerian documentary filmmaker Malek Bens­maïl set up his camera in the news­room of the famous daily paper El Watan, the spea­rhead of the Alge­rian inde­pendent press, to film the proce­dures and thought processes behind jour­na­lism during the last presi­den­tial elec­tion. Accom­mo­da­ted since Alge­ria’s Bloody Decade of the 1990’s in the “House of the Press,” the jour­na­lists of the famous daily news­pa­per El Watan await the comple­tion of their new offices, a symbol of their inde­pen­dence.

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FILM | In the Last Days of the City + Q&A with Director Tamer El Said
Oct
17
6:30 PM18:30

FILM | In the Last Days of the City + Q&A with Director Tamer El Said

Tamer El Said’s ambitious debut feature tells the fictional story of a filmmaker from downtown Cairo played by Khalid Abdalla (The Kite Runner, United 93, Green Zone, The Square) as he struggles to capture the soul of a city on edge while facing loss in his own life. Shot in Cairo, Beirut, Baghdad and Berlin during the two years before the outbreak of revolution in Egypt, the film’s multi-layered stories are a visually rich exploration of friendship, loneliness and life in cities shaped by the shadows of war and adversity.

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New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF)
Apr
26
to Apr 27

New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF)

The Middle East Institute is proud to be a co-sponsor of the annual New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF), a showcase of contemporary feature, documentary, and short films by and about the Amazigh people of North Africa and in the diaspora. NYFAF's mission is to create a space where the filmmakers, artists, and scholars of indigenous Amazigh identity and culture can gather yearly to share their knowledge and enthusiasm while fostering dialogue with a diverse audience of students and thinkers gathered from across New York City and the world. Through pre- and post-screening Q & As, live performances, and exhibitions of art and artifacts, the New York Forum of Amazigh Film seeks to disseminate Amazigh cinema and promote an understanding of the unique history, culture, and language of Amazigh peoples in North Africa and in the diaspora.

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Apr
2
6:30 PM18:30

FILM | Between Fences Film Screening + Q&A with Director Avi Mograbi

Film screening and Q&A with Avi Mograbi, director, and Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Profesor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literatures.

Introduction by Brinkley Messick, director of the Middle East Institute.

Avi Mograbi and Chen Alon meet African asylum-seekers in a detention facility in the middle of the Negev desert where they are confined by the state of Israel. What leads African refugees to leave everything behind and go towards the unknown? Why does Israel refuse to take into consideration the situation of the exiled, thrown onto the road by war, genocide and persecution? Can the Israelis working with the asylum seekers put themselves in the refugees' shoes?

You can watch the Q&A session here.

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Mar
27
6:00 PM18:00

FILM | Ghost Hunting

Ghost Hunting. A film by Raed Andoni.
Screening and Q&A with the director and Professor James Schamus.

Katharina Otto-Bernstein Screening Room, Lenfest Center for the Arts, Columbia University

Director Raed Andoni places a newspaper advertisement in Ramallah. He is looking for former inmates of the Moskobiya interrogation centre in Jerusalem. In his ad he asks that the men should also have experience as craftsmen, architects or actors. After a casting process that almost feels like role play, he arranges for a replica of the centre’s interrogation rooms and cells to be built to scale inside a hall – under close supervision from the former inmates and based on their memories. In this realistic setting the men subsequently re-enact their interrogations, discuss details about the prison, and express the humiliation they experienced during their detention. Using techniques that are reminiscent of the so-called ‘theatre of the oppressed’ they work together to dramatise their real-life experiences. Their reconstruction brings long repressed emotions and undealt with trauma to the fore. Working on the film takes its toll on the men – both physically and mentally. The director also appears in front of the camera; not only is he creating a stage for his protagonists, he is also coming to terms with his own fragmented memories of imprisonment in Moskobiya thirty years previously.

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SCREENING | Looted and Hidden Palestinian Archives in Israel
Sep
27
5:30 PM17:30

SCREENING | Looted and Hidden Palestinian Archives in Israel

The film Looted and Hidden focuses on a number of groundbreaking institutions that were plundered: The Palestine Research Center, the Palestinian Cinema Institution (PCI) and the Cultural Arts Center (CAS) of the PLO. These bodies were among the first to document Palestinian existence and to preserve, research and chart the visual and written Palestinian history from the late 1960s onward. Looted and Hidden , the first film devoted to the subject, follows pioneering, bold, and idealistic creators and directors and the archives they built, focusing mainly on the cinematic enterprise created by the CAS and PCI. Tracing their pillaging, administration and control by Israel - looting, censorship, denial of access, and erasure - the film raises questions about archival institutions in areas of conflict and points, as in detective work, to the need to dig into the invisible and hidden in order to reveal what has been erased or rewritten.

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Film Screening: The Other Town - Why Do Nations Clash?
Feb
26
8:00 PM20:00

Film Screening: The Other Town - Why Do Nations Clash?

  • 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

With Filmmaker Nefin Dinç.

Introduction by Christine Philliou
Associate Professor at the Department of History, Columbia University

"The Other Town" is a documentary film about Turks and Greeks and the source of stereotypes, misunderstandings and prejudices against the "Other." It is about how the stereotypes and misunderstandings are perpetuated in education in a broader sense in Greece and Turkey countries. In this film, the filmmakers have collaborated with the writer Hercules Millas to see where these prejudices are still coming from even though the last war between the two nations took place about a 100 years ago. They filmed the national celebrations, religious ceremonies and history lessons in both countries throughout a year to find an answer to this question.

The film has won the "Audience Award" at Thessaloniki Documentary Film Festival and the "Best Historical Documentary" at Greek Film Festival, Chicago.

To find more information on the film, and watch the trailer, click here.

Sponsored by the Middle East Institute, the Program in Hellenic Studies, and the Harriman Institute 

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Mar
28
7:00 PM19:00

From Armenia to New York: Five Short Films and Evening with Young Armenian Filmmakers

  • 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us for a screening and discussion of five short films by up-and-coming Armenian filmmakers Ophelia Harutyunyan, Jesse Soursourian, Viktorya Aleksanyan, Eric Shahinian, and Anahid Yahjian, followed by a Q&A with the directors moderated by Raffi Asdourian (from A&E, Sundance Channel). 

This event is free and open to the public. Food and refreshments provided. 

This event is organized by the Columbia graduate student group OASIES (Organization for the Advancement of Studies of Inner Eurasian Societies), and sponsored by the Armenian Society of Columbia University, the Harriman Institute, the Middle East Institute, the Kurdish Studies Student Association, and the Armenian General Benevolent Union. 

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Kamran Shirdel and His Cinema: Screening and Round-table with Kamran Shirdel, Amir Naderi, and Hamid Dabashi
Mar
5
7:15 PM19:15

Kamran Shirdel and His Cinema: Screening and Round-table with Kamran Shirdel, Amir Naderi, and Hamid Dabashi

  • 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Kamran Shirdel is considered one of Iran's most influential documentary filmmakers.Women's Prison (1966), Tehran is the Capital of Iran (started in 1966, but finished in 1980), The Red Light District (1967-80) and The Night It Rained (1967) are among his most well-known films made during the Pahlavi era. Throughout the 70s and 80s, he directed a substantial number of commissioned industrial documentaries, many of them now considered as the classics of their genre in Iran, for their lyricism, abstraction, and irony. 

For more information on Kamran Shirdel, please visit:http://bigstory.ap.org/article/noted-iranian-filmmaker-makes-first-us-visit 

Amir Naderi, now living in New York for more than two decades, has directed some of the most celebrated films in the history of Iranian cinema. After a number of years of working in the film industry as a still photographer, he made his feature debut Goodbye Friend in 1970, and in 1971 The Dead-end. Shot in stark black and white, these two films offered shockingly dark images of the urban sprawl that is the capital of Iran. The Runner made in 1984 became the first film from the post-revolutionary Iran to gain international acclaim. In 1993 Naderi made Manhattan by Numbers, his first film after moving to New York. 

Hamid Dabashi is the Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. After finishing his first college degree at the University of Tehran he moved to the United States, where he received a dual Ph.D. in Sociology of Culture and Islamic Studies from the University of Pennsylvania in 1984. He wrote his doctoral dissertation on Max Weber's theory of charismatic authority with Philip Rieff, the most distinguished Freudian cultural critic of his time. He engages with Iranian cinema by not only placing specific filmic texts within the larger socio-political context, and the Iranian intellectual history, but also by opening them to other artistic modes such as Persian poetry and fiction. 

Free and open to the public. 

This event is sponsored by Columbia's Middle East Institute, MESAAS, and School of the Arts (FILM).

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Feb
17
8:00 PM20:00

Al-Intithar, inside Jordan's Zaatari Refugee Camp

  • 403 International Affairs Building, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join Mario Rizzi for a screening of his documentary Al-Intithar (The Waiting), which narrates the life of a Syrian refugee mother and her three children in Jordan's Zaatari Camp. The short film was first shown at the Berlin Film Festival competition in February 2013. Film to be followed by a Q&A with the director. 

This event is sponsored by the Middle East Institute. 

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Jan
29
6:15 PM18:15

Poetics of Pedagogy in Revolution: First Case, Second Case (1979, Kiarostami, 47')

  • Michelson Theater, Department of Cinema Studies (6th floor), NYU Tisch School of the Arts (map)
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Screening and Round-table discussion 

Discussion moderated by:

  • Hadi Gharabaghi, New York University
    With Panelists:
    Agnes Devictor, University of Paris 1, Pantheon - Sorbonne
    Jean-Michel FRODON, Slate.fr, Sciences Po Paris, St. Andrews
    Alisa Lebow, University of Sussex
    Mohammad Salemy, Independent Curator


  • Free and open to the public.


This event is sponsored by NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, Columbia's School of Art and Film, the Iranian Studies Initiative and the Middle East Institute. 

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"The Law in These Parts" film screening and Q&A with director Ra'anan Alexandrowicz
Oct
23
4:20 PM16:20

"The Law in These Parts" film screening and Q&A with director Ra'anan Alexandrowicz

  • 102B Jerome Greene Hall, Columbia Law School (map)
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Hosted by Professor Katherine Franke, Director of the Center for Gender & Sexuality Law. Q&A with the Director, Ra'anan Alexandrowicz to follow the screening. 

The Law in These Parts explores the four-decade-old Israeli military legal system in the Occupied Territories. Since Israel conquered the territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip in the 1967 War, the military has imposed thousands of orders and laws, established military courts, sentenced hundreds of thousands of Palestinians, enabled half a million Israeli "settlers" to move to the Occupied Territories and developed a system of long-term jurisdiction by an occupying army that is unique in the world. 

The Law in These Parts examines this unprecedented and little-known story through testimonies of the military legal professionals, who were the architects of the system and helped run it in its formative years. 

This event is part of the Milbank Faculty-Student Intellectual Life Series. 

Sponsored by the Human Rights Institute and Middle East Institute. 

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The Global Landscape of Mira Nair
Sep
17
6:30 PM18:30

The Global Landscape of Mira Nair

  • Wood Auditorium, Avery Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

View on YouTube

Women Creating Change, a global initiative of the Center for the Study of Social Difference, is proud to invite you to a film screening and discussion, featuring acclaimed film director Mira Nair (Salaam Bombay, Monsoon Wedding, The Namesake, and now, The Reluctant Fundamentalist). Nair will be in conversation with Mabel Wilson, Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation and Anupama Rao, Barnard Department of History. 

Lila Abu-Lughod, Director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference will moderate. 

Click here for directions to Columbia University. 

Seating is limited. Priority will be given to attendees with Columbia University IDs. Overflow space is available in 114 and 115 Avery Hall, and in Brownie's Cafe. 

Sponsored by the Columbia University School of the Arts, the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, the South Asia Institute, the Middle East Institute, and the Heyman Center for the Humanities

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Revolt in Syria: Violence through a lens
Mar
26
7:30 PM19:30

Revolt in Syria: Violence through a lens

  • 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for a screening of short films and videos followed by a Q & A with Syrian playwright and activist Mohammad Al Attar and theatre director Eyad Houssami, editor of Doomed by Hope: Essays on Arab Theatre

This program of short films and videos by activists, amateurs, filmmakers, and citizen journalists offers intimate perspectives on the tragedy in Syria today. The videos include new material from film organizations such as Kayani for Audio-Visual Arts and Abounaddara, which broadcasts emerging talent directly online. 

The title is a tribute to the late Syrian activist Basel Shehada, who was killed in May 2012 by government shelling on the besieged city of Homs, where he was filming and training other activists. 

Sponsored by Alwan for the Arts and the Middle East Institute.

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"This is Where We Take Our Stand" Film Screening and Q&A
Apr
23
7:30 PM19:30

"This is Where We Take Our Stand" Film Screening and Q&A

  • 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

"This is Where We Take Our Stand" is the story of fifty five courageous veterans who publicly told their accounts of the realities they witnessed on the ground in Iraq and Afghanistan. In March of 2008, two hundred and fifty veterans and active-duty soldiers marked the fifth anniversary of the invasion of Iraq by gathering in Washington, DC, to testify from their own experience about the nature of the occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq. It was chilling, horrifying, and challenging for all who witnessed it. 

Against tremendous odds, they brought the voices of the veterans themselves into the debate. "This is Where We Take Our Stand" is the inside story of those three days and the courageous men and women who testified-a story that's as important to tell today as ever. 

Please watch the trailer here: http://thisiswherewetakeourstand.com 

The Q&A will feature Jose Vasquez and Jason Lemieux. 

Jose Vasquez is the Executive Director of Iraq Veterans Against the War. He served fourteen years in the U.S. Army and was honorably discharged in 2007 as a conscientious objector. Jose was a key organizer of Winter Soldier: Iraq and Afghanistan, Eyewitness Accounts of the Occupations and represented IVAW in the editing process for the book published by Haymarket. He is pursuing a Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at CUNY Graduate Center conducting research on the politics of veteran status in contemporary American society. 

Jason Lemieux testified at the Winter Soldier Hearings. He served three tours in Iraq with Third Battalion, Seventh Marines. Lemieux is a Masters Candidate at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). 

Co-sponsored by the Middle East Institute and the Human Rights Working Group.

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"Between Two Worlds" Film
Dec
8
8:00 PM20:00

"Between Two Worlds" Film

  • 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS is a groundbreaking personal exploration of the community and family divisions that are redefining American Jewish identity and politics. The filmmakers' own families are battlegrounds over loyalty to Israel, interpretations of the Holocaust, intermarriage, and a secret communist past. 

Filmed in the United States and Israel, this first-person documentary begins with a near riot at a Jewish Film Festival in San Francisco, reveals the agonizing battle over divestment from Israel on a university campus, and shows the crackdown on dissent in Israel itself. 

Please watch the trailer here: http://btwthemovie.org/ 

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Transcolonial Fanon: Trajectories of a Revolutionary Politics
Dec
2
9:30 AM09:30

Transcolonial Fanon: Trajectories of a Revolutionary Politics

  • Buell Hall, East Gallery, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A documentary on Frantz Fanon, Frantz Fanon: His Life, His Struggle, His Work, (Cheikh Djemai, 2001, 52 min.) will be shown on THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1 at 7:30 p.m. in Buell Hall, East Gallery. 

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of Frantz Fanon's death, an international group of scholars addresses the diverse sources, trajectories and reinscriptions of his thought. Participants will consider Fanon's biographical and intellectual migration between the French Caribbean and North Africa, and between the theory of race and the project of anticolonial nationalism, and discuss his legacy across continents and across disciplines. 

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Film Screening and Panel Discussion: "We Are Egypt"
Oct
19
6:00 PM18:00

Film Screening and Panel Discussion: "We Are Egypt"

  • 179 Grace Dodge Hall, Teachers College, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Free: ID required
This documentary tells the story of the story of the struggle for democracy in Egypt that led to the historic uprising in January-February 2011. Filmed on the ground in Egypt over the preceding fourteen months, this story is told through the eyes of Egypt’s youth activists, labor movements and political opposition figures. It is an account of their struggle against extraordinary odds to remove an uncompromising US-backed authoritarian regime determined to stay in power. Going beyond the recent headlines, director Lillie Paquette offers the background story of years of mounting political resentment against the ruling regime. 

This event is sponsored by the Institute of African Studies, Institute of Comparative Literature and Society, and the Middle East Institute. 

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