Outreach

Filtering by: Outreach

An Era of Restrictions & Bans: Collecting Oral Histories: A Professional Development Course for Teachers
Jul
20
to Jul 21

An Era of Restrictions & Bans: Collecting Oral Histories: A Professional Development Course for Teachers

In this Trumpian Era where Muslim Bans and discrimination against Muslims and immigrants is at the forefront of the current administration’s agenda, it is even more imperative to tell Muslim stories. This two-day intensive workshop will focus on how to collect oral histories, how to craft a hands-on oral history project for students, and why it is important to collect Muslim oral histories. 

Documenting memories, from which meaning can be preserved and drawn out, is at the heart of oral history. Everyday personal commentaries that escape our collective attention are recorded through well-designed recorded interviews. Recordings are then transcribed, summarized, or indexed and then archived or disseminated in various formats. The method of collecting oral history can easily be developed as a project for students in many grades, one which opens up ways of knowing (literacy, developing research skill sets, networking, publishing) from community members and the significance of documenting localized memories.

Guided by an anthropologist of education, Dr. Amina Tawasil, Lecturer of Anthropology and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, participants will be go through every step and angle of developing and executing an oral history project.

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Decentering the State: Refugees, Migration, and Displacement: A Professional Development Course for Teachers
Jun
29
to Jun 30

Decentering the State: Refugees, Migration, and Displacement: A Professional Development Course for Teachers

As the Syrian Civil War enters its eighth year, images of refugees continue to flood the media. While diaspora, displacement and migration increasingly define the human experience they remain difficult subjects to engage with and teach. President Trump’s initiatives - to cancel DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Migrants), build a wall on the US/Mexico border, limit refugee resettlement programs, and ban travel from Muslim majority countries - make discussions about displacement and migration in the classroom imperative. In addition to a lack of comprehensive and accessible instructional materials on these subjects, there is also the need to advise educators on how they can hold space for discussions that might be difficult for students.

This intensive two-day course will cover: historical and contemporary cases of displacement and migration and how to create space in classrooms for difficult conversations and divergent opinions. The first day offers an examination of legal categories such as 'citizen,' 'displaced person,' and 'refugee,' the movement of people around the world and the related geopolitical conflicts and social concerns that charge these topics. The second day focuses on the tools needed to plan and execute lessons based on the content from day one. Led by specialists from Teachers College at Columbia University, participants will learn how to translate content and implement strategies to create open, welcoming and supportive learning environments for students in order to discuss topics that may be highly emotional and politically charged. 

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New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF)
Apr
26
to Apr 27

New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF)

The Middle East Institute is proud to be a co-sponsor of the annual New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF), a showcase of contemporary feature, documentary, and short films by and about the Amazigh people of North Africa and in the diaspora. NYFAF's mission is to create a space where the filmmakers, artists, and scholars of indigenous Amazigh identity and culture can gather yearly to share their knowledge and enthusiasm while fostering dialogue with a diverse audience of students and thinkers gathered from across New York City and the world. Through pre- and post-screening Q & As, live performances, and exhibitions of art and artifacts, the New York Forum of Amazigh Film seeks to disseminate Amazigh cinema and promote an understanding of the unique history, culture, and language of Amazigh peoples in North Africa and in the diaspora.

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Mar
3
to Mar 4

Spring 2018 Teacher Professional Development Workshop: Trading Companies and the Rise of Global Capitalism in South Asia and the Indian Ocean (c. 1600 - 1900)

This Professional Develeopment workshop will examine the regions of South Asia and the Indian Ocean and the impact of European trading companies in these regions between 1600- 1900. It will explore how trade and politics intersected to create forms of global capitalism still seen today, and how these historical evolutions help us understand current debates about corporations and states, money and politics.

Participants must be K-12 teachers, two- or four-year college instructors or students enrolled in graduate education degree programs. If you would like to register for either workshop, or have questions, please contact William Carrick at wac2112@columbia.edu. Participants may register for one or both days.

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Citizenship and Nationality in Israel/Palestine
Jun
24
9:00 AM09:00

Citizenship and Nationality in Israel/Palestine

The day-long workshop will be based on an Open University curriculum designed by Katherine Franke, Professor of Law at Columbia University, who will teach the course. Drawing on comparisons with the US legal system and establishment of the United States as a nation-state, Franke will give an overview of the issues at hand, offering teachers tools that will allow them to go back to their own classrooms and teach a unit on Israel/Palestine.

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Reconfiguring Representations of the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia
Jun
15
5:00 PM17:00

Reconfiguring Representations of the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia

Media sources have constructed problematic images about the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia (MENASA). Through this symposium, we hope to begin conversations about representations within curriculum and teaching, and cultivate culturally relevant pedagogy when teaching students from these regions.
 

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