May
3
12:30 pm12:30

The Middle East Institute Presents: "Iran: The Role of Women in the Reform Process" by Mehrangiz Kar

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Mehrangiz Kar, is a human rights lawyer, writer, essayist, and former editor of the now-banned Zan literary review. Her work as an activist for women's rights often put her in conflict with the Iranian authorities. Kar has published widely on women's issues in Iran. Her publications include Children of Addiction: Social and Legal Position of the Children of Addicted Parents in Iran (1990); Quest for Identity: the Image of Iranian Women in Prehistory and History (1992).

 

Apr
29
12:30 pm12:30

The Student Council on Islamic World Affairs and the Middle East Institute of Columbia University Present: "The View From Inside: Iran's Nuclear Ambitions" by Prof. Nasser Hadian

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Prof. Hadian is a Visiting Adjunct Professor at Columbia’s Department of Middle Eastern and Asian Languages and Cultures. He is a member of the faculty of Law and Politics at the University of Tehran, and has contributed to various publications with regard to Iranian domestic politics.

 

Apr
19
12:30 pm12:30

The Middle East Institute Presents: "The New Israeli Historians" by Ilan Greilsammer

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Prof. Greilsammer is a full Professor in Comparative Politics and Israeli Politics at the Department of Political Science of Bar- Ilan University (Ramat-Gan, Tel-Aviv) and Director of the Center for European Studies of Bar-Ilan University. He is the author of a dozen of books on French politics and Israeli politics. He holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne).

Apr
12
12:30 pm12:30

The Middle East Institute Presents: "Civil Society and the Battle for the Arab Soul" by Saad Ibrahim

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Born in Egypt, Prof. Ibrahim received his education at Cairo University and U. of Washington. He is also the founder and first Secretary General of the Arab Organization for Human Rights (1983-87). Because of their advocacy of democracy and defense of human rights, he and 27 of his associates were arrested in 2000, tried and convicted twice and sentenced by an Egyptian State Security Court to 7 years at hard labor. Upon an appeal Egypt's highest Court of Cassation tried him a third time, acquitted him and his 27 associates of all charges. Saad Ibrahim is a visiting professor this Spring at Columbia University and New York University.

 

Apr
8
12:30 pm12:30

The International Media and Communications (IMC) Program at SIPA and the Middle East Institute Presents: "The Iran Hostage Crisis - Roots of Reform?" by Bill Berkeley

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Bill Berkeley is a former reporter and editorial writer for The New York Times and the author of The Graves Are Not Yet Full -- Race, Tribe and Power in the Heart of Africa (2001).

Prof. Berkeley has just returned from his second journey to Iran this year. He will give an update on his current book project, a reexamination of the Iran hostage crisis as seen from the vantage point of a generation later. He is focusing on the surviving Iranian hostage-takers, some of whom have emerged in middle age as leading figures in Iran's embattled reformist movement, in vehement opposition to the ruling mullahs in whose name they acted in their youth.

The talk was videotaped and can be viewed at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/news/media/04/291_iran_hostage_crisis_reform

Apr
1
12:30 pm12:30

The Middle East Institute Presents: "Urban Structure and Social Integration in Istanbul" by Caglar Keyder

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Dr. Keyder is a Sociology Professor at Bogazici University in Istanbul and at SUNY-Binghamton. Most recently, he is the author of From the Ottoman Empire to the European Union (in Turkish). He is also the author of State and Class in Turkey, and he edited and contributed to Istanbul: Between the Global and the Local.

Mar
25
12:15 pm12:15

"The Religious Dimension in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict" by Shmuel Sandler

  • Linday Rogers Room (7th floor) International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Presented by the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, The Comparative Defense Studies Program, and the Middle East Institute.
Dr. Stephanie Neuman, Comparative Defense Studies Program

Dr. Shmuel Sandler is currently The Sara and Simha Lainer Professor in Democracy and Civility at Bar-Ilan University. He is also an Associate at The Begin-Sadat Center For Strategic Studies. His research interests include Religion and International Relations, International Politics and Comparative Government; The Arab-Israeli Conflict; Israeli Politics and Foreign Policy; and Ethnonational Politics and Foreign Policy. Dr. Sandler has authored numerous books, articles, and reviews. His most recent book, in collaboration with Jonathan Fox, is Bringing Religion Back to International Relations.

 

Mar
11
12:30 pm12:30

The Middle East Institute Presents: "Democratizing the Muslim World: 'Yes, but...'" by Charles Dunbar

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Mr. Dunbar is a SIPA alumnus. He was a U.S. diplomat for 31 years and served as Ambassador to Yemen during the 1991 Gulf War. Earlier, he was Ambassador to Qatar and Chargé d'Affaires in Kabul during the Soviet Union's occupation of Afghanistan. He also served in Iran, Afghanistan, Morocco, Algeria, and Mauritania. In 1998, he was Secretary-General Kofi Annan's Special Representative responsible for the U.N.'s effort to organize a referendum in Western Sahara, which has been occupied by Morocco since 1975. He is currently Warburg Professor in International Relations at Simmons College in Boston.

 

Mar
4
12:30 pm12:30

The Middle East Institute Presents: "Against All Reason: The US Administration's Litany of Errors in Iraq" by Peter Sluglett

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Peter Sluglett has been Professor of Middle Eastern History at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, since 1994; he taught at the University of Durham between 1974 and 1993. His doctoral thesis, published as Britain in Iraq,1914-1932 in 1976, was on the British mandate in Iraq; he is also co-author (with the late Marion Farouk- Sluglett, of Iraq since 1958: from Revolution to Dictatorship (3rd revised edition, 2001). He has just edited a large collective volume on the comparative history of the British and French mandates in the Middle East, and is working on a monograph on the social history of Aleppo between the late nineteenth century and the end of the French mandate.

Feb
19
12:00 pm12:00

"Occupying Iraq: Lessons and Comparisons Drawn from the US Occupation of Japan"

  • Dag Hammarskjold Lounge (6th Floor) International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Presented by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, The Middle East Institute, and The Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies.

Featured speakers include:
Phebe Marr, Council on Foreign Relations
John Dower, Massachussetts Institute of Technology
Rashid Khalidi, Columbia University
Jack Snyder, Columbia University

Moderator:
Charles Armstrong, Columbia University

Feb
12
12:00 pm12:00

"US-Middle East Relations: Challenges of the 21st Century" by Ambassador Ahmad Kamal

  • 1134 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Presented by the Middle East Institute, The Southern Asian Institute and The US-Middle East Council.

Ambassador Ahmad Kamal served as a professional diplomat in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Pakistan for close to forty years. During this period he held diplomatic postings in India, Belgium, France, the Soviet Union, Saudi Arabia, and with the United Nations both in Geneva and in New York.

 

Feb
9
12:30 pm12:30

"Russian Policy in the Middle East: Moscow's Position on the Iraqi Crisis" by Prof. Alexei Vasiliev

  • 1118 International Affairs Building, Columbia University

Presented by the Middle East Institute and The Harriman Institute.

Alexei Vasiliev is the director of the Institute of African and Arab Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences and editor-in-chief of Asia and Africa Today. He has written extensively on relations between Russia and the Middle East.