WORKSHOP | Sharīʿa Workshop with Robert Gleave
Dec
4
6:00 PM18:00

WORKSHOP | Sharīʿa Workshop with Robert Gleave

Rob Gleave is Professor of Arabic Studies and Director of the Centre for the Study of Islam (CSI), IAIS, University of Exeter Gleave is currently Principal Investigator of 2 major projects: Understanding Shari’a: Past Present Imperfect Present (www.usppip.eu) and Law and Learning in Imami Shi’ite Islam (LAWALISI). We will discuss his precirculated paper. To receive a copy, contact amb49@columbia.edu. 

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TALK | Mayy Ziyadah's Salon as a "Modernity" Dynamic
Nov
30
7:00 PM19:00

TALK | Mayy Ziyadah's Salon as a "Modernity" Dynamic

The presentation highlights the actual role played by Mayy Ziyādah, not only as a salonniere, but also as an intellectual in her own right with a significant role in the Nahḍah in twentieth century Egypt. As her name is most often associated with the salon, Professor Khaldi will demonstrate the intellectual climate of that salon, its capacity to bring together different factions and to emerge thereby as a microcosm of the Nahḍah, in its complexity and hybrid nature. With these goals in mind, she will draw on an extensive amount of material, supported by a theoretical framework that helps in envisioning the salon as a public sphere.

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TALK | The Qur’an in the Enlightenment
Nov
30
6:00 PM18:00

TALK | The Qur’an in the Enlightenment

The Qur'an was an object of scholarly attention in the eighteenth century, when, in the wake of Lodovico Marracci's philological Latin achievement of 1698, a number of writers attempted a literary translation of the holy book of Islam. In the same period, the Qur'an also served as a multivalent symbol--of revealed religion, of literature, and of law. This paper first examines the scholarly achievements of the period's European translators from Arabic, and then compares them to the Qur'an's reception in the Enlightenment to reveal both the connections and the differences between philological and "philosophical" reception in this formative era of Western intellectual culture.

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TALK | The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt: Evolution in Organization and Ideology from the early 1970s until 2017
Nov
29
6:00 PM18:00

TALK | The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt: Evolution in Organization and Ideology from the early 1970s until 2017

Contrary to the generally accepted conceptualization of the Brotherhood as an ‘Islamist movement’, we will understand the Brotherhood as a modern political organization. We will focus on the various internal political and personality clashes that have characterized the Brotherhood’s life as an organization, how these conflicts have contributed to the Brotherhood’s downfall in 2013, and how internal politics continues to shape the Brotherhood’s political behavior today.

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Nov
29
1:00 PM13:00

Tunisia: An Arab Anomaly

Safwan M. Masri, Executive Vice President of Global Centers and Global Development will discuss his new book, Tunisia: An Arab Anomaly. Welcome by SIPA Dean Merit E. Janow; Moderated by Lisa Anderson Dean Emerita, SIPA & James T. Shotwell Professor Emerita. Books will be available for sale and signing.

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TALK | Beyond Fighting ISIS: Gender, Conflict & Nationalism
Nov
20
6:30 PM18:30

TALK | Beyond Fighting ISIS: Gender, Conflict & Nationalism

This talk aims to move beyond simplistic and often celebratory accounts of Kurdish women fighters resisting ISIS in Syria and Iraq by exploring underlying ideological and political underpinnings. We illustrate the dialectical relationship between the writings of the political leader (Öcalan), and the resistance to male hegemony within the movement on behalf of Kurdish women activists. We interrogate the long-term prospect of radical gender equality and justice in a context of escalating conflict, militarization and the prevalence of conservative gender norms and relations, particularly pertaining to sexuality.

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CONFERENCE | Sites of Religious Memory in an Age of Exodus: the Eastern Mediterranean
Nov
17
9:00 AM09:00

CONFERENCE | Sites of Religious Memory in an Age of Exodus: the Eastern Mediterranean

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DESCRIPTION

This day-long event is the first of a three-piece series that focuses on the movement of people across and along the Mediterranean and the emergence, re-signification, and use of sites of memory. Bringing together a mix of panelists from the humanities and social sciences, the day will include work by the following scholars. Emrah Yildiz (Northwestern University) will present his work on “The Ways of Zainab: Ziyarat & Maqam,Visitation and the Shrine, in the Syrian Age of Exodus.” Faiz Ahmed (Brown University) will discuss “Indo-Afghans and Religious Memory in the Ottoman Mediterranean: Jaffa to Jerusalem, Tripoli to Istanbul.” Columbia’s Dimitrios Antoniouwill talk about “Memories of a Spatial Imagination: The Athens Mosque and the Politics of Sacrifice.”And Adnan A. Husain(Queen’s University) will speak about “Miraculous Commemorations: The Easter Fire at the Holy Sepulchre in Medieval Jerusalem. ”

Respondents will include Leyla Amzi-ErdogdularNaor Ben-Yehoyadaand Avinoam Shalem.

Organized by Seth Kimmel and Naor Ben-Yehoyada.

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TALK | MARNIA LEZREG
Nov
16
4:10 PM16:10

TALK | MARNIA LEZREG

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About

Foucault lived in Tunisia for two years and travelled to Japan and Iran more than once. Yet throughout his critical scholarship, he insisted that the cultures of the "Orient" constitute the "limit" of Western rationality. Using archival research supplemented by interviews with key scholars in Tunisia, Japan and France, this book examines the philosophical sources, evolution as well as contradictions of Foucault's experience with non-Western cultures.  Beyond tracing Foucault's journey into the world of otherness, the book reveals the personal, political as well as methodological effects of a radical conception of cultural difference that extolled the local over the cosmopolitan.

Bio

Marnia Lazreg is professor of sociology at Hunter College. She is a graduate of the University of Algiers from which she received a Baccalaureate in Mathematics, and Philosophy as well as a licence-ès-Lettres, with three distinctions.  She also received an MA and a Ph.D. in sociology from New York University.   She was awarded fellowships at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women (Brown University); the Bunting Institute (Harvard); The Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), the Rockefeller Bellagio Center, Italy, as well as a Fulbright grant to Algeria.   Her research focuses on the structures that inform cultural change as well as shape conceptions of self, identity and gender relations in societies undergoing the transition from colonial and/or economic dependence to political sovereignty. A parallel interest is to identify and theorize the frequent gap between theoretical concepts applied to non-Western societies and the reality they intend to explain, which may hamper cross cultural understanding. 

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TALK | War is Coming: Between Past and Future Violence in Lebanon
Nov
16
12:30 PM12:30

TALK | War is Coming: Between Past and Future Violence in Lebanon

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About

In War Is Coming, Sami Hermez argues that the country’s political leaders have enabled the continuation of violence and examines how people live between these periods of conflict. What do everyday conversations, practices, and experiences look like during these moments? How do people attempt to find a measure of certainty or stability in such times? Hermez’s ethnographic study of everyday life in Lebanon between the volatile years of 2006 and 2009 tackles these questions and reveals how people engage in practices of recollecting past war while anticipating future turmoil. Hermez demonstrates just how social interactions and political relationships with the state unfold and critically engages our understanding of memory and violence, seeing in people’s recollections living and spontaneous memories that refuse to forget the past. With an attention to the details of everyday life, War Is Coming shows how even a conversation over lunch, or among friends, may turn into a discussion about both past and future unrest. Shedding light on the impact of protracted conflict on people’s everyday experiences and the way people anticipate political violence, Hermez highlights an urgency for alternative paths to sustaining political and social life in Lebanon.

 

Sami Hermez, PhD, is assistant professor in residence of anthropology at Northwestern University in Qatar.  He obtained his doctorate degree from the Department of Anthropology at Princeton University. His recently published book with Penn Press, War is Coming: Between Past and Future Violence in Lebanon (2017), focuses on the everyday life of political violence in Lebanon and how people recollect and anticipate this violence. His broader research concerns include the study of social movements, the state, memory, security, and human rights in the Arab World. He has held posts as Visiting Scholar in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, Visiting Professor of Contemporary International Issues at the University of Pittsburgh, Visiting Professor of Anthropology at Mt. Holyoke College, and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Lebanese Studies, St. Antony’s College, Oxford University. At Northwestern in Qatar he teaches classes in anthropology that include topics such as violence, gender, and anthropology in the Middle East.

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Nov
13
12:00 PM12:00

Jerusalem Without God: Portrait of A Cruel City

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About

An intimate portrait of the daily realities of life in contemporary Jerusalem

There is no escaping the Jerusalem of the religious imagination. Not once but three times holy, its overwhelming spiritual significance looms large over the city’s complex urban landscape and the diurnal rhythms and struggles that make up its earthbound existence. Nonetheless, writes Paola Caridi, in this intimate and hard-hitting portrayal of the city, it is possible to close one’s eyes and, “like the blind listening to sounds,” discern the conflict and plurality of belonging that mark out the city’s secular character. Jerusalem without God leads the reader through the streets, malls, suburbs, traffic jams, and squares of Jerusalem’s present moment, into the daily lives of the men and women who inhabit it. Caridi brings contemporary Jerusalem alive by describing it as a place of sights and senses, sounds and smells, but she also shows us a city riven by the harsh asymmetry of power and control embodied in its lines, limits, walls, and borders. She explores a cruel city, where Israeli and Palestinian civilians sometimes spend hours in the same supermarkets, only to return to the confines of their respective districts, invisible to each other; a city memorable for its ancient stones and shimmering sunsets but dotted with Israeli checkpoints, “postmodern drawbridges,” that control the movement of people, ideas, and potential attackers. Describing Jerusalem through the lenses of urban planners and politicians, anthropologists and archaeologists, advertisers and scholars, Jerusalem without God reveals a city that is as diverse as it is complex, and ultimately, argues its author, one whose destiny cannot be tied to any single religious faith, tradition, or political ideology.

Bio

Paola Caridi, Ph.D., journalist and historian, lecturer at Palermo University (Italy). Caridi lived in Cairo and Jerusalem from 2001 to 2012, where she worked as a reporter and analyst on Middle East affairs. She wrote extensively (essays and books) on MENA region, especially on Palestinian and Egyptian politics. Among her books, Hamas: From Resistance to Government (NY, Seven Stories Press, 2012). Here recent book, Jerusalem without God, has been published in 2017 by the American University in Cairo Press. From 2008 she maintains her blog, invisiblearabs.com, on Arab popular culture and politics.

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TALK | Intervention: An Eastern Mediterranean genealogy
Nov
10
9:30 AM09:30

TALK | Intervention: An Eastern Mediterranean genealogy

The times in which we live are rife with interventions - humanitarian, financial, and political - into the inner affairs of sovereign states. Deep incisions into the body politic, they injure even as they seek to heal, upturning conventional understandings of the state as an autonomous entity by inserting foreign elements beneath its skin. This paper sketches out a genealogy for these practices, tracing them back to the nineteenth-century Mediterranean and the particular sovereign arrangements born of the Ottoman empire’s unhappy encounter with Britain and France. From the 1830s onwards, it argues, these two states devised novel ways of organising population, territory, and debt and new understandings of sovereignty.

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TALK | The Discovery of Ancient Carthage and the Reception of Antiquity in 19th Century Tunisia
Oct
31
1:30 PM13:30

TALK | The Discovery of Ancient Carthage and the Reception of Antiquity in 19th Century Tunisia

In Tunis, the first collections of antiquities were established in the 18th - 19th centuries. European Consuls, foreign scholars, and international traders acquired most of the archaeological remains then available from the ancient city of Carthage. Whether growing out of their personal taste, commercial considerations, or a desire for cultural distinction, they enriched the collections of major European museums. This collecting practice was not limited to foreigners, but also touched the local ruling class.

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Oct
31
12:00 PM12:00

BOOK TALK | Democratic Transition and the Rise of Populist Majoritarianism: Constitutional Reform in Greece and Turkey

October 31st from 12-2PM Knox Hall Room 207 Ioannis N. Grigoriadis, Associate Professor and Jean Monnet Chair of European Studies at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration at Bilkent University, Turkey,  will be discussing his new book, "Democratic Transition and the Rise of Populist Majoritarianism: Constitutional Reform in Greece and Turkey".  This comparative study explores the impact of populist majoritarianism on Greek and Turkish democratic transition. Using the case studies of Greece and Turkey, the author argues that while majoritarianism is often celebrated as a manifestation of popular sovereignty, it can undermine institutional performance. In cases of transition states where social capital is scarce and polarization is high, it can even upset the process of democratic consolidation, contributing to a confrontational and inefficient democratic regime. A “mild democracy” would require a calibrated system of checks and balances, trust- and consensus-building mechanisms. This book will be of use to students and scholars interested in the fields of Greek and Turkish politics, law and democratization. http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319575551 Special offer - get 20% of the print book or ebook! Use code Grigoriadis17 on palgrave.com Valid 31/10/17 - 31/12/17 You can find a video interview of Professor Grigoriadis here.

October 31st from 12-2PM
Knox Hall Room 207

Ioannis N. Grigoriadis, Associate Professor and Jean Monnet Chair of European Studies at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration at Bilkent University, Turkey,  will be discussing his new book, "Democratic Transition and the Rise of Populist Majoritarianism: Constitutional Reform in Greece and Turkey". 

This comparative study explores the impact of populist majoritarianism on Greek and Turkish democratic transition. Using the case studies of Greece and Turkey, the author argues that while majoritarianism is often celebrated as a manifestation of popular sovereignty, it can undermine institutional performance. In cases of transition states where social capital is scarce and polarization is high, it can even upset the process of democratic consolidation, contributing to a confrontational and inefficient democratic regime. A “mild democracy” would require a calibrated system of checks and balances, trust- and consensus-building mechanisms. This book will be of use to students and scholars interested in the fields of Greek and Turkish politics, law and democratization.

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319575551

Special offer - get 20% of the print book or ebook! Use code Grigoriadis17 on palgrave.com Valid 31/10/17 - 31/12/17

You can find a video interview of Professor Grigoriadis here.

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Oct
30
12:30 PM12:30

TALK | New Frames for the Bey of Tunis: Creating an Official Art in the Age of the Great Reforms (1830-1881)

Located in the center of the Mediterranean, far from the capital of the Ottoman Empire, Istanbul, Tunisia experienced an important transformation during the 19th century. Starting in the reign of Ahmad Bey (1837-1853) the period ended, after the gradual disintegration of the Tunisian State, with the installation of the French Protectorate in 1881. It remains a decisive moment of great political, intellectual and social progress for the kingdom of Tunisia under the rule of the Husainid monarchy, against a background of realignment in the Mediterranean Basin. During this complex period of European Imperial expansion, Tunisia undertook the modernization of its state through a series of reforms, which saw the country assume its autonomy and equip itself with an enduring framework. From the Art perspective, this same period was particularly fascinating with the coexistence of Ottoman, local and European Art, appreciated by a new cosmopolitan ruling class who asserted their power through the collection, particularly through the art of portrait, which was becoming very popular and marked a new form of power in Tunisia.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Ridha Moumni read Art History and Archaeology in Paris, at La Sorbonne University, where he earned his Ph. D. He researches classical, modern and contemporary art from a global and transnational perspective, with emphasis on questions of collecting practice and intellectual history. Winner of several prizes he was the first Tunisian Fellow at the French Academy in Rome (Villa Medici). Curator of exhibitions of photography and modern art, he recently organized with the Rambourg Foundation The Awakening of a Nation: Art at the Dawn of Modern Tunisia (1837-1881) to commemorate the 60th birthday of the National Independency. Dr. Moumni is currently head of project of the creation of the Qsar es-Saïd Art Museum, the future museum of Ottoman era in Tunisia.

Introductions by: Brinkley M. Messick
Event Location: Knox Hall, 606 W. 122 St., New York, NY Room 207
Sponsors: Middle East Institute and Columbia Global Centers

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BOOK TALK | Family Life in the Ottoman Mediterranean: A Social History
Oct
24
5:30 PM17:30

BOOK TALK | Family Life in the Ottoman Mediterranean: A Social History

In writings about Islam, women and modernity in the Middle East, family and religion are frequently invoked but rarely historicized. Based on a wide range of local sources spanning two centuries (1660-1860), Beshara Doumani argues that there is no such thing as a typical Muslim or Arab family type that is so central to Orientalist, nationalist, and Islamist political imaginations. Rather, one finds dramatic regional differences, even within the same cultural zone, in the ways that family was understood, organized, and reproduced. In his comparative examination of the property devolution strategies and gender regimes in the context of local political economies, Doumani offers a groundbreaking examination of the stories and priorities of ordinary people and how they shaped the making of the modern Middle East.

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Oct
24
5:30 PM17:30

SHARIA WORKSHOP

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About

Beshara Doumani, Professor of History and Director of Middle East Studies at Brown University, will discuss his new book. Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies and History, will introduce Doumani. Commentary by Baber Johansen, Professor of Islamic Religious Studies, Harvard Divinity School, and Brinkley Messick, Professor of Anthropology and MESAAS and Director of the Middle East Institute at Columbia, will follow the talk.

Speaker Bio

Beshara Doumani is a Professor of History and Director of Middle East Studies at Brown University. His research focuses on groups, places, and time periods marginalized by mainstream scholarship on the early modern and modern Middle East. He also writes on the topics of displacement, academic freedom, politics of knowledge production, and the Palestinian condition. His books include Family Life in the Ottoman Mediterranean: A Social History, Rediscovering Palestine: Merchants and Peasants in Jabal Nablus, 1700-1900, Academic Freedom After September 11 (editor), and Family History in the Middle East: Household, Property and Gender (editor). He is the editor of a book series, New Directions in Palestinian Studies, with the University of California Press.

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Oct
23
12:15 PM12:15

BOOK TALK | We Crossed A Bridge and It Trembled: Voices From Syria

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About the Book: We Crossed A Bridge and It Trembled: Voices From Syria

LONG-LISTED FOR THE CARNEGIE MEDAL

Reminiscent of the work of Nobel Prize winner Svetlana Alexievich, an astonishing collection of intimate wartime testimonies and poetic fragments from a cross-section of Syrians whose lives have been transformed by revolution, war, and flight.

Against the backdrop of the wave of demonstrations known as the Arab Spring, in 2011 hundreds of thousands of Syrians took to the streets demanding freedom, democracy and human rights. The government’s ferocious response, and the refusal of the demonstrators to back down, sparked a brutal civil war that over the past five years has escalated into the worst humanitarian catastrophe of our times.

Yet despite all the reporting, the video, and the wrenching photography, the stories of ordinary Syrians remain unheard, while the stories told about them have been distorted by broad brush dread and political expediency. This fierce and poignant collection changes that. Based on interviews with hundreds of displaced Syrians conducted over four years across the Middle East and Europe, We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled is a breathtaking mosaic of first-hand testimonials from the frontlines. Some of the testimonies are several pages long, eloquent narratives that could stand alone as short stories; others are only a few sentences, poetic and aphoristic. Together, they cohere into an unforgettable chronicle that is not only a testament to the power of storytelling but to the strength of those who face darkness with hope, courage, and moral conviction.

Author Bio:

WENDY PEARLMAN is an Associate Professor; and Martin and Patricia Koldyke Outstanding Teaching  Professor at North Western University.

Wendy has studied or conducted research in Morocco, Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Germany, Spain, Israel, and the West Bank and Gaza Strip. She has written two books and more than a dozen articles or book chapters about the Palestinian national movement, focusing on internal politics and the causes and consequences of political violence.

Wendy is also co-authoring a second book with Boaz Atzili (American University). It examines “triadic coercion”: the situation when a state uses violence and/or threats against another state to compel it to stop violence from a nonstate actor on its territory. The manuscript offers a critical analysis of sixty-five years of Israel’s experience with this policy.

Wendy has received fellowships from Fulbright, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the U.S. Institute of Peace, the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and Northwestern’s Buffett Institute. She has been awarded the Weinberg College Distinguished Teaching Award and has three times been elected to the Associated Student Government Faculty Honor Roll. Her articles have received prizes from the Syrian Studies Association and the Moise Khayrallah Lebanese Diaspora Studies Center.

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BOOK TALK | Arab Patriotism – The Ideology and Culture of Power in Late Ottoman Egypt
Oct
18
4:00 PM16:00

BOOK TALK | Arab Patriotism – The Ideology and Culture of Power in Late Ottoman Egypt

Arab Patriotism: The Ideology and Culture of Power in Late Ottoman Egypt (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2017) challenges the received narrative that Arabism in general and Egyptian territorial nationalism in particular emerged in opposition to the Ottoman and British Empires and primarily from below. The author argues instead that early Arabic nationalist culture was produced in dialogue with the localized Ottoman power by educated Arabs who integrated Muslim and European cultural forms in their search for political inclusion and patronage.

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Oct
17
12:00 PM12:00

TALK | Post-Isis Monetary Policy and Reconstruction of Iraq

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About

Tuesday, October 17; 12:00pm-1:00pm
Warren 208
Sponsored by Columbia University Middle East Institute & Columbia Business
 School Middle East and North Africa Club

Dr. Brinkley Messick, Director, Middle East Institute of Columbia University, will moderate a discussion between H.E. Dr. Ali Mohsen Ismail Al-Allaq, Governor of the Central Bank of Iraq, and Mr. Mohammed Hussein Moh’d Ali Bahr AlUloom, Permanent Representative of Iraq United Nation, NY. Lunch will be served. 

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Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

TALK | The Italian and Mediterranean Colloquium with Simone Brioni

Simone Brioni's paper analyses to what extent Deleuze and Guattari’s definition of the three main features of ‘minor literature’ – namely ‘the deterritorialization of language, the connection of the individual to a political immediacy, and the collective assemblage of enunciation’ – are relevant in analyzing literature by authors of Somali origins in Italian.

Because of Deleuze and Guattari’s abstract reference to gender and race issues and their vague concern for the geographical, linguistic and cultural specificities of literatures by minor authors, she will argue that ‘minor literature’ should not be seen as a rigid framework to be applied in interpreting a specific case study, although its theoretical flexibility might be useful when investigating a literature that strongly refuse categorization. In particular, Deleuze and Guattari’s reference to ‘minor’ ‘literature as a literature ‘in becoming’ helps to identify the position of Somali Italian literature in a transnational context, proposing some changes in how 'Italian' literature has been conceptualized so far.

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SCREENING | Looted and Hidden Palestinian Archives in Israel
Sep
27
5:30 PM17:30

SCREENING | Looted and Hidden Palestinian Archives in Israel

The film Looted and Hidden focuses on a number of groundbreaking institutions that were plundered: The Palestine Research Center, the Palestinian Cinema Institution (PCI) and the Cultural Arts Center (CAS) of the PLO. These bodies were among the first to document Palestinian existence and to preserve, research and chart the visual and written Palestinian history from the late 1960s onward. Looted and Hidden , the first film devoted to the subject, follows pioneering, bold, and idealistic creators and directors and the archives they built, focusing mainly on the cinematic enterprise created by the CAS and PCI. Tracing their pillaging, administration and control by Israel - looting, censorship, denial of access, and erasure - the film raises questions about archival institutions in areas of conflict and points, as in detective work, to the need to dig into the invisible and hidden in order to reveal what has been erased or rewritten.

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TALK | The Mediterranean Incarnate
Sep
14
6:15 PM18:15

TALK | The Mediterranean Incarnate

In The Mediterranean Incarnate, anthropologist Naor Ben-Yehoyada takes us aboard the Naumachos for a thirty-seven-day voyage in the fishing grounds between Sicily and Tunisia. He also takes us on a historical exploration of the past eighty years to show how the Mediterranean has reemerged as a modern transnational region. From Sicilian poaching in North African territory to the construction of the TransMediterranean gas pipeline, Ben-Yehoyada examines the transformation of political action, imaginaries, and relations in the central Mediterranean while detailing the remarkable bonds that have formed between the Sicilians and Tunisians who live on its waters.

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