Turkey's Kurdish Question: What Do the 1990s Tell Us About Contemporary Politics?

  • 208 Knox Hall, Columbia University

The Kurdish question is one of the most complicated and protracted conflicts of the Middle East and will never be resolved unless it is finally defined. The majority of the Kurdish people live in Turkey, which gives the country a unique position in the larger Kurdish conundrum. Society in Turkey is deeply divided over the definition and even existence of the Kurdish question, and this uncertainty has long manifested itself in its complete denial, or in accusations of political rivals of ‘separatism’ and even ‘treason’.

Karen Barkey, Director of the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life, will act as interlocutor.

Akin Unver is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Kadir Has University, specializing on energy politics, conflict psychology and radicalization sociologies. In addition, he studies discourse theory, Regional Security Complex Theory and psychoanalytical approaches to decision-making and teaches courses on Politics of the Middle East, Diplomatic History, Energy Security and Security Theory.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Middle East Institute at Columbia University.