Dec
9
12:10 pm12:10

Yemen in the Midst of Civil and Regional War: Is There a Way Out?

  • 103 Jerome Greene Hall, Columbia Law School

A discussion with Farea Al-Muslimi, Sanaa Center For Strategic Studies & Carnegie Middle East Center.

What went wrong in Yemen and where is it heading? The internationally backed political transition following the 2011 uprising was cited as a successful peaceful transition model, but in September 2014 the Houthis armed militas took over the capital by force and the country descended to full-scale civil war with frequent human rights violations by all sides. Saudi Arabia has also intervened heavily, and has often been accused of committing war crimes with its airstrikes. The Saudi intervention has been supported by the United States. What happened to the 2011 peaceful "Arab Spring"? Is there a way out in Yemen and what should and shouldn't the world (especially western powers) do to help get Yemen out of the current turmoil?

This event is sponsored by the Human Rights Institute, Rightslink, the Human Rights Law Review, Institute for the Study of Human Rights and the Middle East Institute.

Minorities in a Turbulent Middle East: From Authoritarianism to Revolution and Civil War
Dec
9
12:00 pm12:00

Minorities in a Turbulent Middle East: From Authoritarianism to Revolution and Civil War

  • 208 Knox Hall, Columbia University

A Discussion with Harout Ekmanian.

Were minorities really safe under authoritarian dictatorships after Colonial mandates left the Near East region as the official narratives claim? How and at what expense did they did sustain their cultural, religious, and civic rights under these regimes? How are they surviving in the midst of the sectarian storms sweeping the region more recently?

Raised in Syria, Harout Ekmanian is a journalist and lawyer currently based in Armenia. He reports on Turkey and the Middle East, focusing on regional dialogue and the conflict in Syria. 

Towards a New Regime Type: Competitive Authoritarianism of Political Islam in Turkey
Dec
8
4:15 pm16:15

Towards a New Regime Type: Competitive Authoritarianism of Political Islam in Turkey

  • 208 Knox Hall, Columbia University

With Koray Caliskan, Bogazici University, Department of Political Science and International Relations.

Caliskan is Associate Professor of Politics at Bogazici University. Working on Middle East politics and political parties, Caliskan worked as a columnist with Radikal and BirGün newspapers and as a program host for HaberturkTV and +1 News in Istanbul. He received his Ph.D. with distinction from New York University with which he won the Malcolm Kerr Social Science Award from MESA. His book Market Threads came out from Princeton University Press and focused on Egypt, Turkey and the US. Caliskan also owns a production company and made three documentary films on the illegal oil trade, Turkish peasants and Turkish TV series, and wrote and produced a popular feature on the Kurdish question that opened in 200 theatres in Europe and Turkey. 

Dec
3
6:00 pm18:00

Modernities: Discontent and Alliances

  • 612 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

NADA SHABOUT (University of North Texas)
with discussant Zainab Bahrani (Columbia University)

'Islamic' Art: Disrupting Unity and Discerning Ruptures
A series of lectures to address the historiography of the field 'Islamic Art' by scoring the particular moments of ruptures that fractured its foundations.

Organized by Avinoam Shalem, Riggio Professor, Arts of Islam, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, in collaboration with the Middle East Institute at Columbia University. 

A Conversation with Mohamed Fahmy
Nov
24
4:30 pm16:30

A Conversation with Mohamed Fahmy

  • World Room, Columbia University School of Journalism

MOHAMED FAHMY

Mohamed Fahmy is an award-winning Egyptian-Canadian journalist and author.

His most recent post as the Egypt Bureau Chief of Al Jazeera International captured world attention when he was arrested and charged with conspiring with the Muslim Brotherhood and fabricating news to serve the fundamentalist group’s agenda. He was incarcerated for over 400 days and released on September 15, 2015.

This event is co-sponsored by the Middle East Institute, the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Arab and Middle Eastern Journalists Association - Columbia J-School Chapter. 

The EU and the Arab World
Nov
12
6:00 pm18:00

The EU and the Arab World

  • 5th Floor Auditorium, Robert Kraft Center, Columbia University


Lina Khatib, Senior Research Associate with the Arab Reform Initiative, and former Director of the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut.
Michael Leigh, Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund, and former Director-General for enlargement at the EU Commission.
Adam Tooze, Director, European Institute; Professor of History, Columbia University.

The European Union and its closest neighbors in the Arab world are facing multiple challenges. What are the lessons learned from the Arab Spring? What can be done to address the migrant and refugee crisis? What is the way forward for the EU Neighborhood Policy in the region?

This event is sponsored by the European Institute and the Middle East Institute. 

This Muslim American Life
Nov
12
6:00 pm18:00

This Muslim American Life

  • 509 Knox Hall, Columbia University

Join Moustafa Bayoumi, who has been interviewing and listening closely to Muslim Americans, in a wide-ranging conversation about what the War on Terror looks like from the vantage point of Muslim Americans.

Moustafa Bayoumi is Professor of English at Brooklyn College, City University of New York (CUNY). 

The Untold Story of Women in Iran
Nov
5
6:00 pm18:00

The Untold Story of Women in Iran

  • Event Oval, Diana Center, Barnard College

Join us for an engaging discussion of what Ansary describes as “the unanticipated consequences of measures undertaken by the Islamic regime, which ironically ended up empowering women.”
 

After Charlie Hebdo: French Laicite and Islam: Can the "Republican Model" hold?
Nov
4
6:00 pm18:00

After Charlie Hebdo: French Laicite and Islam: Can the "Republican Model" hold?

  • William and June Warren Hall, Columbia Law School

Panel discussion with Abdennour Bidar, Patrick Simon, and Ethan Katz, moderated by Souleymane Bachir Diagne.

Panelists will discuss the social integration of Muslims in contemporary France and the consequences of the current debates on secularism (laïcité) and the "Republican model" for islamophobia.

This event is sponsored by the Columbia Maison Francaise, Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life, Alliance Program, European Institute, Heyman Center for the Humanities, and the Middle East Institute. 

Photographing Ottoman Modernity
Oct
22
6:00 pm18:00

Photographing Ottoman Modernity

  • 612 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

ZEYNEP CELIK (New Jersey Institute of Technology)

'Islamic' Art: Disrupting Unity and Discerning Ruptures
A series of lectures to address the historiography of the field 'Islamic Art' by scoring the particular moments of ruptures that fractured its foundations.

Organized by Avinoam Shalem, Riggio Professor, Arts of Islam, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, in collaboration with the Middle East Institute at Columbia University. 

Alternative Narratives of the Middle East
Oct
17
9:00 am09:00

Alternative Narratives of the Middle East

  • Graduate School of Journalism, Columbia University


Times: 9am-12.30pm, 6-9pm

The Columbia Journalism School, in conjunction with the Brown Institute for Media Innovation, the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma, and the Middle East Institute of Columbia University, is hosting a mini-conference on covering alternate narratives of the Middle East.

The event will highlight best practices and offer guidance on covering the region in ways that move beyond the recurring conflict motifs to reveal the diversity and complexity of world views and lived experiences of those in the region.

The conference will be comprised of two morning panel discussions (9am-12:30pm) with journalists and journalism educators and an evening event (6-9pm) with a panel discussion and concert with celebrated Lebanese indie band, Mashrou' Leila.

Speakers (confirmed so far) include: Ahmed Shihab-Eldin, Nina Ansary, Sheila Coronel, Nahed Eltantawy, Shahira Fahmy, Lonnie Isabel, Alia Malek, Souad Mekhennet.

Tickets for the Mashrou' Leila panel and discussion can be purchased here.

RSVP for the morning panels here

Assia Djebar: Patterns of Resistance Conference
Oct
16
10:00 am10:00

Assia Djebar: Patterns of Resistance Conference

  • Columbia Maison Francaise, 2nd Floor Buell Hall, Columbia University

The death of the Algerian writer and filmmaker Assia Djebar in February 2015 represents the loss of a major voice of world literature and one of the last great literary representatives of the age of decolonization. For half a century, Djebar explored her country’s past and present in novels, essays and films that combine poignant lyricism with theoretical sophistication. Counter-narratives to official nationalism, her works highlight, above all, the experiences of Algerian women before, during and after colonialism. In this one-day conference an international group of leading scholars reflects on Djebar’s poetics and politics and the legacies of her writing in Algeria, France and beyond.

The conference will include three panels: Overtures and Departures; Memory and Mourning; and History and Fantasy; and a keynote address by Gayatri Spivak.

This event is co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Française and the Middle East Institute at Columbia University. 

Hannibal in Rafah: A Forensic Reconstruction of One Day in the 2014 Gaza War
Sep
21
6:00 pm18:00

Hannibal in Rafah: A Forensic Reconstruction of One Day in the 2014 Gaza War

  • 612 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

EYAL WEIZMAN, Goldsmiths, University of London.


'Islamic' Art: Disrupting Unity and Discerning Ruptures
A series of lectures to address the historiography of the field 'Islamic Art' by scoring the particular moments of ruptures that fractured its foundations.

Organized by Avinoam Shalem, Riggio Professor, Arts of Islam, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, in collaboration with the Middle East Institute, Columbia University. 

Turkey's Kurdish Question: What Do the 1990s Tell Us About Contemporary Politics?
Sep
17
12:30 pm12:30

Turkey's Kurdish Question: What Do the 1990s Tell Us About Contemporary Politics?

  • 208 Knox Hall, Columbia University

The Kurdish question is one of the most complicated and protracted conflicts of the Middle East and will never be resolved unless it is finally defined. The majority of the Kurdish people live in Turkey, which gives the country a unique position in the larger Kurdish conundrum. Society in Turkey is deeply divided over the definition and even existence of the Kurdish question, and this uncertainty has long manifested itself in its complete denial, or in accusations of political rivals of ‘separatism’ and even ‘treason’.

Karen Barkey, Director of the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life, will act as interlocutor.

Akin Unver is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Kadir Has University, specializing on energy politics, conflict psychology and radicalization sociologies. In addition, he studies discourse theory, Regional Security Complex Theory and psychoanalytical approaches to decision-making and teaches courses on Politics of the Middle East, Diplomatic History, Energy Security and Security Theory.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Middle East Institute at Columbia University.